blank'/> Liberally Lean From The Land Of Dairy Queen: We're Full - Per The Austin American Statesman

8.07.2006

We're Full - Per The Austin American Statesman

7 comments:

greta said...

I am curious what the majority of those criminals are in for.

Anonymous said...

greta - you finally ask a decent question. Let's do some research and post here. I'll bet most are for superficial - non treating crimes (done primarily by minorities).

Anonymous said...

what is a non treating crime?

Anonymous said...

Aaagh - misspelling - threatening. sorry

Anonymous said...

Here’s a good source of prison info. Texas is a “star” in this report as it so exceeds most all other states AND countries! Data from 1998.
http://www.cjcj.org/pubs/texas/texas.html

An excerpt:
 In 1998, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice reported that of its then 130,000 prisoners, 54.8% were being held for a non-violent crime. If these offense proportions held true for the 1999 BJS prison counts, there would be 89,428 inmates held for non-violent crimes in Texas. Just by itself, Texas' non-violent prison population represents the second largest state prison population in the country (next to California). Texas' non-violent prisoner population is larger than the entire incarcerated population of the United Kingdom (73,545)--a country of 60 million people-- and bigger than New York's prison system, our 3rd largest state.19
 Of the almost 37,000 inmates entering the Texas prison system in 1998, more than two out of every three entered prison on a parole or probation violation. Of these, an estimated half were charged not with breaking the law by committing new crimes, but for committing technical violations, such as missing a meeting with a parole officer.20
 Twenty one percent (21%) of the people in Texas prisons are there for drug related charges.21 While a large number on its own, the 21% figure understates the role drug incarceration policies have played in driving up the prison population totals, as it does not include people serving time for drug related crimes such as theft or burglary. Eighty-five percent of the prison population has a history of drug or alcohol abuse.

OK then, our prisons are full of druggies and parole violators. Do you feel safer now? Check out the link for more depressing statistics. The date of this study was thru 1998 so the problem just seems to have gotten worse.

Anonymous said...

You should never believe statistics that are published by an inside source. I can tell you that I am very familiar with several aspects of state/county jails and prisons. One prison facility that I am very familiar with houses 1000 inmates. I must admit that several are parole violators, which indicates they are "non-violent" criminals. These offenders appear on TDCJ paperwork as non-violent because they are parole violators; however, those individuals aren't properly identified by their original commitment record. In other words, the facility that I am referencing has several offenders that are identified as non-violent, but are parole violators for sexual assaults. My point is the website listed only confuses the real facts. Of the 1000 offenders that I referenced above, 62% are sexual predators of children or women and are properly identified as such in their original commitment information, but not identified as violent in their paperwork when they return as a parole violator; however, several offenders that are identified as burglars were breaking in someone's home with the intent of sexual assault, but plea out for burglary to keep from going to trial and having to register as a sex offender upon release. My point is, jut don't believe everything that you see in someone's statistics because they can be slanted to prove either side of an argument.

Anonymous said...

Anon 1:36, TxSheehan only believes what she wants to believe. The facts only get in her way of thinking.