The Campaign For DA

11.07.2007

Pakistan


Let's turn down the lights for a moment.

About three weeks ago, my subscribed issue of Newsweek arrived with the cover story being about Pakistan. That country doesn't cross my mind on a regular basis. But the weekly magazine proclaimed Pakistan the most dangerous country in the world over Iraq, Iran, and Afghanistan with the following freaky foreshadowing:

Today no other country on earth is arguably more dangerous than Pakistan. It has everything Osama bin Laden could ask for: political instability, a trusted network of radical Islamists, an abundance of angry young anti-Western recruits, secluded training areas, access to state-of-the-art electronic technology, regular air service to the West and security services that don't always do what they're supposed to do. (Unlike in Iraq or Afghanistan, there also aren't thousands of American troops hunting down would-be terrorists.) Then there's the country's large and growing nuclear program. "If you were to look around the world for where Al Qaeda is going to find its bomb, it's right in their backyard," says Bruce Riedel, the former senior director for South Asia on the National Security Council.

The conventional story about Pakistan has been that it is an unstable nuclear power, with distant tribal areas in terrorist hands. What is new, and more frightening, is the extent to which Taliban and Qaeda elements have now turned much of the country, including some cities, into a base that gives jihadists more room to maneuver, both in Pakistan and beyond.

Over the weekend, all hell broke out in Pakistan. Hold your breath. They have The Bomb.