6.20.2012

7 On 7 Football -- Asking The Masses

Longhorn (Struggling) QB David Ash Back At A 7 On 7 Tourney

I saw a post on Facebook the other day of a Wise County mother complaining of how much running and conditioning her son was going through for 7 on 7 football.  It dawned on me then that I really know nothing about it other than (1) it's no contact, (2) it's great for quarterbacks and receivers, and (3) it is supposed to be completely separate from high school coaches.

But I wonder if there's a seedy underside to it.

But for those of you familiar with it:

  • Who coaches these teams?
  • How many would Bridgeport or Decatur have? 
  • Who decides who gets on each team?
  • Are high school coaches completely detached from this thing?
  • Is there a cost?
Let me hear from you.

Edit: A Faithful Reader emailed me that Channel 8 did an investigative report on this subject in 2010:


43 comments:

Anonymous said...

It is to keep kids from playing other sports and keep them in football year round. NATZI's

Anonymous said...

7 on 7 is new since I was playing, but I can tell you there's a seedy underside. Coaches who aren't coaching, are watching. Kind of like my old field house that used to be "available" for use during the summer, but they'd take roll every day.

7 on 7 is great though. It's modeled after rugby's Summer 7's, which has been around longer, at least in Texas as far as I know of. I played Summer 7's in college, and it was a blast. Ran my ass off, which was already in decent shape. But constant running in the middle of the day in the summer is different than two-a-days, or even three-a-days.

Rage

Anonymous said...

WOW and to think a simple parent decision of MY KID WILL NOT PLAY THIS SPORT is too hard to do.

There are just too many idiots on this earth!

Anonymous said...

Amen 10:10

Anonymous said...

HS coaches are heavily involved in it! At the school district I work at the coaches practice 7 on 7 during the period. They put together the plays and put players in the positions they want them. They have taken players to games. They check the rosters to see who does not show and then go after them the next day in school for not being there! They berate players who choose baseball over 7 on 7 games! I have even seen coaches come down and get players out of middle school to workout with hs players during the hs athletic period. They tell kids to be a summer workouts over the summer (summer conditioning camp that lasts all summer) or they won't play in fall. In public schools-Football is the MOST important thing in school--not getting an education!!

Anonymous said...

Brett Shipp taunted the Trinity & Southlake football programs on Facebook to publicize his news story concerning 7 on 7 summer ball.

Shipp deleted that Facebook message after Uncle Barky (Ed Bark) reported on Shipp's shenanigans.

Brett Shipp said and I quote:

"Southlake's coaches are in hot water. What's more, see what happens when they invite Number 1 ranked Trinity into the hot tub with them. Sniff, sniff!!!! Is that the smell of two cooked seasons?"

Anonymous said...

7 on 7 type football is probably where the sport is headed at the high school level and below. As we get a better understanding of concussions and other injuries, parents will catch on and begin to hold their children out of football. We are just at the beginning of that transition faze, rational people that love the sport are still in denial.

Anonymous said...

coaches are not involved.

df chuck curtis (hardy har)

Anonymous said...

My son did it the first year in Decatur. I think they all enjoyed it very much and kept them in condition. Plus, it kept them together as a team, playing together and spending time getting to know each other. They were good enough to go to "finals" at Texas A & M. Many of the parents went for all or part of the three day camp. This was also a good "bonding" time for families to spend time as a group.
Sure, coaches watch from the sidelines. It tells the coaches who is serious about playing, their potential, and how they function as a group without a leader present.
I see nothing wrong with it. I'd rather my son be involved on the field than somewhere else off the field!!!

Anonymous said...

Ask some 60 year old former football players about their "sport". Most vigorously discourage their grandchildren from playing football. Unfortunately, kids just think they're indestructible and play anyway.

Anonymous said...

I'm confused. I thought RAGE was a woman.

Anonymous said...

Where do you get your stats 11:04?
Dumb Asses R Us?

Anonymous said...

Given that Shipp's investigation aired and the story died with nary a mention since, I would say that the powers that be don't care that this goes on. Is anyone real surprised that there's a seedy underbelly to an aspect of high school football?

Anonymous said...

All as opposed to the serious cross country runners who run their rears off EXTREMELY early in the morning, and with absolutely NO coaches present! They're given a schedule to run at the end of school to give them guidence on how much to run and when, but nobody oversees them. No need for "investigations" in this sport!

A proud "shout out" to all you serious distance runners everywhere!

Anonymous said...

My son took part in the 7 on 7 and loved it. Of course the coaches encourage the quarterbacks and receivers to take part. They care about their sport and want to be successful...is that so bad?? Better than coaches that just draw a paycheck and don't care about the kids or the program. The coaches give them plays to run but the teams are responsible for getting there on their own and most teams don't even have an adult coaching them. It encourages the kids to work through their game plan on their own and the quarterbacks call the plays not coaches. It seemed to me that all of the kids involved had a great time and it was over before their summer started. I love it and am glad my son had the opportunity to play!!

Upstairs said...

Yes, it is coach controlled but I don't think that necessarily equates to seedy. This is the future of the sport -- if there is one. Watch a couple of Class A 6 man football games and you will learn why. It is alot of fun.

Anonymous said...

Troy aikman and terry bradshaw are very open about not letting kids and grandkids play football.

Anonymous said...

Let me get this straight. RAGE is NOT a lesbian??

Anonymous said...

Chesapeake is laying off 8%.

Word from okc is Devon is next.

Anonymous said...

Did they say seedy underbelly? he,he

Anonymous said...

How many million dollar contracts do cross country runners get? Just asking.

DF Mary Decker Slaney

Anonymous said...

Mark that under who gives a f*** on the football, typical parents who sucked at sports living through there kids. layoffs great, we can get the trash out of WC

Anonymous said...

There was a great article on 7X7 or as we call it here the passing league, in USA today about a month ago and referred to the intensity of the program in Texas and how that allowed this year for so many native Texas QB's to enter the NFL draft. Spread offense, increase passing numbers...they relate to this program. Here the coaches stand on the side and dad's run the program....usually the QB or receivers dad and a few volunteer coaches......One program was with Helmets and the other was without. The one without caused several concussions last year.......Surprise!

Anonymous said...

Yep 10:59... thats our experience as well.

It has it's place.... and been a good experience.

Anonymous said...

From 11:47 AM to 12:37 PM--Yep, you're making my point exactly. Those cross country kids really exert themselves on a true volunteer-type effort, with little notoriety. A true "pure sports effort" merely for the sake of a sport. All with great fitness coming out of it, and very low incidence of injuries (especially life-long debilitating ones). Of course, football is SOOO lucrative to all the players involved (dripping sarcasm). Let's see--hmmm, percentages of high school football players who obtain those "multi-million dollar contracts"--probably about .01% at most. That, along with the HIGH probability of serious, life-long injuries, sure makes "fooball" a "great sport for youth" (more dripping sarcasm)!

This worship of "fooball", and the sacrifice of so many kids' healthy bodies to it, is getting to the downright insane level in our country.

Anonymous said...

Nobody is to blame but the parents.

Anonymous said...

Actually, 11:59, I guess technically I would be.

(Hey Katy, call me!)

Rage

Anonymous said...

coaches do more than stand on the sideline, the coaches are also the referees of the games

Anonymous said...

WHO GIVES A BIG RED RAT'S ASS?

Anonymous said...

Speaking of big red rat's ass, how bout today's RTG? Wood eye!

Anonymous said...

I guess those of you who keep putting down football either didn't make it yourself and/or your son, nephew, cousin, grandson, etc. didn't. My husband played as well as both my sons. "Played" is the optimal word here--they did it because they liked it, not because they had dreams of glory or going to a D1 school or NFL. They just liked it as a part of their school years.
My sons both went to major colleges in Texas on scholarship for grades and high SAT scores. While in high school, they both participated in golf, tennis, soccer, band, art, auto mechanics, etc...Now both have jobs that require advanced degrees, married well, raising their kids to play the sports they want, not have to, play.
My husband didn't make them play, it was entirely up to them. They didn't grow up in Wise County, but in another community where football was very popular. I personally am glad for their experiences because they learned how to be winners and how to be losers gracefully. They learned teamwork, discipline, and the value of hard work.

Anonymous said...

Whatever! Geez, go to Dr. Phil's blog.

Anonymous said...

Troy Aikman can say what he wants with only girls. If he had a son we would here a different tune.

I played 7*7 in the early stages. I thought it was a blast. Coaches were involved because you are practing for the fall. They gave us the wrist bands with the plays on them and things like that.

It was basically the same things we were already working on in spring practice. Oh and it never kept anyone from playing another sport.

Most of the time it is the same kids doing everything anyways.

Anonymous said...

WE live in a culture that has decided that a kid becoming a paraplegic for a first down is worth the risk...

Anonymous said...

Well, 12:40, at least you had academics.

For all you "no-notoriety" cross country folks, the runners do it without notoriety because nobody cares about cross country. Running, in and of itself, is barely a sport. If it is one at all. It's like golf, without the denoument.

DF Quarter Horse

Rage

Sherri said...

this comes from my ol man who is a high school football coach here in edinburg (was in austin prior)...

the school coaches pick their players that they want to participate in 7 on 7 football. some schools will have multiple teams - our school sent 3 teams... varsity, jv, and freshman.

high school coaches are supposed to be completely separate from 7 on 7. the teams are usually coached by a member of the community who generally has some coaching experience.

as for pay, some programs require the athletes to pay... much of the time a community organization will pay for the athletes - around here, the boys & girls club has paid for the players to participate...

Anonymous said...

Contact football should be banned for kids under 18. Parents should take control and prohibit their kids from participating. They won't and banning is unlikely. So kids will continue to have life debilitating injuries. Too bad.

Anonymous said...

My nephew ran cross country and stayed in great shape.Came in second in the F T Worth marathon the first tim he ran it.Is a terrific surgeon now but not a million dollar contract.I can only think of six people in Wise county that made any kind of money in sports.See a lot of them hobble into the cafes with their trick knees an ect.Most are overweight and out of shape now.Just saying

Anonymous said...

It violates the sprit of the UIL rules against year round sports! You should not be able to require someone to volinter to show up for a game if they have other things to do. Most coaches have so little knowlege of human anatomy & physiology as to the fact that young kids need time between hard workouts to let their bodies heal to prvent longterm injury. I have know many coaches that don't seem to care about the student athlete after they have a career ending injury, they are of no use to them or their program. P.S. It is just as bad with girls basketball!

Anonymous said...

The wussification of America is amazing. There are far more people who played football and weren't injured at all. But lets just change everything because someone might get hurt. What a bunch of cry babies.

Anonymous said...

The wussification of America is amazing.

This is what I think every time someone calls Rascal Flats, Lady Antebellum, The Band Perry, or that gay bald guy "country" music.

Rage

Anonymous said...

Damn, I agreed with Rage on two consecutive posts! I must have spent a night or two with "Wendell" or something.

Anonymous said...

I did 7 on 7 during the spring and summer when I was in high school. I went to Bridgeport. We all enjoyed it because the coaches wern't there. We called our own plays. The coaches just let us know when and where the tournaments were.