blank'/> Liberally Lean From The Land Of Dairy Queen: Since This Is A Day That WIll Live In Infamy

12.07.2009

Since This Is A Day That WIll Live In Infamy

Star-Telegram article on "The Lost Battalion"
The 558 men of the 2nd Battalion, 131st Field Artillery, a National Guard outfit with men from Decatur, Bridgeport, Jacksboro, Wichita Falls and neighboring towns, didn’t know anything else about the sneak attack [on Pearl Harbor] and wouldn’t for weeks.
Oddly, there's no Wikipedia article on that group of men but it does refer to others by that name.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

I was there, darndest thing you ever did see!

Fake Crusty Old Soldier War Guy

Double Fake Mrs. Col. Walter E. Kurtz's Friend said...

"I needed the money," he said about why he joined the military.........I think that's why a lot of our Decatur, Bridgeport, Jacksboro, Wichita Falls and neighboring townsfolks, hell, folks from everywhere, joined up for these current wars...

My Dad did, and he ended up a Lt. Col. in the AF, was a fighter pilot in WWII and Korea, and killed lots of people (he's still f^cked up about that)....same as it always was.......war sucks, we smart humans should be able to transcend this. Klatu, where are you?

Oh, and when my husband was in the Navy during Viet Nam, they lost his papers - he was supposed to be deployed on a warship - but he ended up having a pretty fun time. Oh, and he had to make a lot of wooden boxes. Storage things, not caskets. Wooooo for him........

wordkyle said...

If I hadn't seen the same reference several times today, I wouldn't bother -- the actual quote is "a date which will live in infamy."

Double Fake John Bartlett (with apologies to the original DF guy.)

Anonymous said...

The unit mentioned is known mostly in Texas by that name, because it was a Texas National Guard unit.
Their connection with fame is that they were part of the Burma/Siam Railway of Death (see Bridge on the River Kwai).
The other Army units, in Germany during WWII, and the WWI unit, are better known as "Lost Battalion".

Anonymous said...

Too bad the rest of Wise County doesn't get lost.

Anonymous said...

Texas Military Forces Museum
Camp Mabry - Austin, Texas
Also has an exhibit on the “Lost Battalion”
www.texasmilitaryforcesmuseum.org

The Lost Battalion - The 2nd Battalion, 131st Field Artillery, part of the 36th Division, was detached from the Division in 1942 and sent to Java in the Dutch East Indies. When the Dutch surrendered to the Japanese, the Battalion went into captivity for 42 months. The prisoners of war worked on the “Death Railway” in Thailand, of which the bridge over the River Kwai was a part, and in the mines in Manchuria and Japan until they were released when the Japanese surrendered. Prisoners off the sunken cruiser, USS Houston, were also a part of the group. The trials and tribulations of the POWs are the subject of this exhibit.

The members of the Lost Battalion are very closely connected to the crew of the USS Houston with whom they endured the horrors of the Japanese POW camps.
The USS Houston website http://www.usshouston.net/indexback.htm
has a link to the "Lost Battalion" Also a link with photos from the 2008 reunion of the Lost Battalion here; http://www.usshouston.net/LB_08/lb_08.htm

Anonymous said...

Hats off to all our WW11 vets.

Anonymous said...

Quite a few guys from Jack and Wise Counties were in the Lost Battalion. I recall a number of stories that they told. Horrific. Mostly though, it was hard to get them to talk about it. The only remaining survivor that I know of is Luther Prunty in Jacksboro. Jacksboro High School honored him a couple of weeks ago.

Darrel said...

My father-in-law built some railroads and garnered some stories as part of the 2nd Battalion, 131st Field Artillery. He attended all the reunions until his death.

Anonymous said...

and since it is Dec. 7th, why are there not more (all) the flags lowered to half mast? supposed to be done until sunset.

Anonymous said...

Ever since 2001, Pearl Harbor day seems largely ignored. As if it's been replaced. Wonder what will replace 2001? And when?

Mr. Mike Honcho said...

Thank you 3:02pm.

The Wise County Historical Museum also has an exhibit on the Lost Battalion, 2/131FA, 36ID.

A great book about it if you can find a copy is "Our Days Were Years by Horace Teel. I am very glad to have a copy of this book. Hard to find anywhere these days.

http://www.amazon.com/Our-days-were-years-Battalion/dp/0890152071

The 2/131FA came from all over Texas and even from other states. There was a very heavy presence of Wise and Jack County owing to its National Guard organization. They came from towns like Jacksboro, Decatur, Bridgeport, Alvord, Bryson, Boonsville, Chico, Vineyard, and Perrin. You can see their last names about our towns... names like C.A. Cates, Alf. Brown, R. L. Morrow, M.B. Lewis, R.O. Singleton, A.L. Scarbrough, T.L. Capps, E.L. Hudson, B.H. Rodriquez, J.D. Key, J.M. Hicks Jr., J.T. Baker, W.T. Atkinson, J.B. Pitts, R.A. Richey, W.O. Western and many others, too many to type here.

They were walking talking heroes to my dad growing up, (along with all the vets of that war). Its a shame everyone enjoys poking fun at the "backwards" and "redneck" people of this county and doesn't spend a little time learning about the sacrifices it has made. We have bled just like other "more-educated" folks.

Anonymous said...

The Sheriff's Department honors the Battallion by having their Emblem on their patch (since 2001 - the shield with the fleur-de-la). See also http://www.sheriff.co.wise.tx.us/lost_battallion.htm

Anonymous said...

You know BuBear, you have a lot of ugly people that comment on here. No respect whatsoever. I know.....if I don't like it I don't have to come on here and read it.

Anonymous said...

It's disappointing to read the disrespect in some of the above comments. I know all about free speech, but the same people who utilize that right are disrespecting the ones who fought for them to keep it.
The Lost Battalion is very near and dear to my heart. If you ever take the time to read one or more of the numerous books on the subject, I think you'll be amazed by what the men endured. They were an extraordinary group of very strong and patriotic men.