The Campaign For DA

3.02.2015

Grapevine's Fellowship Mega-Church Never Ceases To Amaze


BagOfNothing had a post a couple of days ago about the 25th anniversary of the Church of Bits and mentioned that someone could win $25,000. That certainly got me interested so I had to go and try to find out the details. Yep. a half court basketball shot. I think only five people were selected (probably based upon faith donations and not works) but I'm not exactly sure.

But how bizarre is this? I'm truly stunned.

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

They have no clue what a church really is.

Anonymous said...

They have no clue what a church really is.

Dingle-Barry doesn't either. Which campus of the Gateway Church do you attend, Dingle-Barry?

Anonymous said...

If this is what you're doing for church, you're doing it wrong.

Anonymous said...

Stunned that people who believe Jesus was magic would pull a stunt like this?

No you're not.

Anonymous said...

Religion is dumb.

Anonymous said...

I think I'll make sure all 5 contestants make the shot.

That will teach those pompous preachers.

Double Fake Sweet Baby Jesus

Anonymous said...

Although this is controversial, sponsors bought an insurance policy to cover possible loss, not unlike giving a car away for a hole in one.

Many churches are looking for new ways to attract a new or larger crowd.

One should be very careful when criticizing or judging churches. Just because it doesn't pass someone's approval doesn't mean WE have the right to judge or criticize them.

But, maybe several here can cast the first stone...

Ernest T said...

Anything to draw more people into this "church!" Gotta get 'em in so that they will give us more money!

Anonymous said...

There's a story in the Bible about Jesus helping some guys who were consistently getting nothing but net. John chapter 21, I think.

Anonymous said...

4:47 wins the Internet today.

3:15 - judging or not, it's hard to reconcile the ministry of Christ as it appears in the New Testament with what happens at that "church."

Anonymous said...

Another publicity stunt to sucker in the weak minded and get into their pockets.

Baylor Too said...

Barry, have you noticed that Hamlin from Better Call Saul looks exactly like Grapevine's pastor, Ed Young? They could be twins.

Anonymous said...

Glad to see there's no shortage of snark from those every bit as sanctimonious as those who they portray as the same.

In Matthew 4:19/Mark 1:17, Jesus called for his disciples to become "fishers of men". He wanted to spread the Word to the masses. I don't attend FC, and I'm not sure it'd be my cup of tea. But, in 2015, purchasing an insurance policy to attract new followers to hear the message doesn't sound all that heretical to me.

amyg said...

Desperate measures from a dying breed

Anonymous said...

In Deuteronomy 22:21, the Word of God tells us that an impure woman should be brought to her father's doorstep and stoned to death by all the guys in town.

Anonymous said...

What would Jesus say about this?

Anonymous said...

Not sure these mega churches are all they are cracked up to be - at least those in the Metroplex.

I've had members of Gateway tell me they hardly ever see the same folks each week and it is so big they don't feel a part of it.

Makes sense to me.

Anonymous said...

My family attended one of Gateway's satellite campuses for about a year. We attended the same service every week, and with the exception of two couples, we rarely saw the same people.

We were also involved in a "small group" that consisted of several families that we became friends with. Within one week of our leaving Gateway, every single one of those people unfriended us on Facebook.

Megachurches do some great work - they give lots of money to charities, help foreign missions, and do a great job of spending money throwing big, splashy events with big-name speakers like the Duck Dynasty guys.

But make no mistake: they are corporations. Their business is selling God, and business is good. But the prosperity gospel generally is an easy sell here, isn't it?

You don't have to look any further than the pastoral staff and their salaries/lifestyles. When a pastor has millions in real-estate holdings and drives multiple cars that are near or over six figures, questions should arise. And when pastors take a six-week vacation every summer (4 weeks of vacation and 2 weeks sabbatical to write another book to sell) because "that's what a CEO does," you don't have to wonder where their heart is.

Anonymous said...

Very short sighted comments. Few of us want to study the history of anything. It might get in the way of our desire to criticize without consequences.
I'm a Christian and I really don't care for this kind of evangelism. But the history of the Christian church is that it has changed methods many, many times. This is just the latest. Remember, fallible people are involved.

Anonymous said...

True, criticism for the sake of criticism is destructive. But criticism for the sake of refining or redirecting has benefit and is necessary - it's what has led to those changes in methods, and it is far from being without consequence.

And much like the situations that necessitated those earlier changes, decrying the lie that is the prosperity "gospel" is vital. We've reached a stage in our history where Christianity is once again being used as a tool to acquire wealth and power, and people need to understand and rebel against that.

mzchief said...

I have said, for years, churches are little more than semi-private clubs that toss in some God-talk and a touch of good works to assure tax-free benefits. If conservatives were sincere about getting people off the national teet, they'd push to have churches pay their fair share.

Anonymous said...

A priest, a rabbi and a baptist preacher were playing golf. The subject of collections came up, it went something like this.

Priest: After Mass on Sunday, I take the collection plate to my office. I keep 10% for myself and send 90% to the diocese.

Rabbi: After Synagogue, I take the collection plate and keep half for myself and half for the Temple.

Baptist Preacher: After Sunday Church Service, I go into my office and throw all the collections up in the air as far as I can. God keeps his share, and I keep everything that hits the ground.

Anonymous said...

1 Peter 2
18 Slaves, accept the authority of your masters with all difference not only those who are kind and gentle, but also those who are harsh, for it is to your credit if being aware of God you endure pain while suffering unjustly.

Anonymous said...

I have attended services for years at Gateway.

Never once have they passed a collection plate.

Seldom is tithing or donating to their church part of the sermon.

Anonymous said...

1:49 -

This is not a personal attack, but either your memory is less than stellar, or you attend infrequently.

While it is true that Gateway does not pass a collection plate, they make it clear that you can drop off your tithes and offerings at the collection boxes by the door. In addition, there is no shortage of directions in the weekly program and announcements on how to give.

As for seldom preaching tithing/giving, Robert Morris first gained attention through his book "The Blessed Life," which is based wholly on teaching that tithing is mandatory and that if you fail to tithe you will be cursed. In addition, when I attended he preached an entire series on The Blessed Life, which covered in detail the concepts of the book which, again, are that you must tithe or be cursed. This is a series that he has preached repeatedly at Gateway, and he has stated numerous times that he is frequently asked to preach a condensed version at other churches.

According to the sermon archives on Gateway's website, this series (which is anywhere from six to eight parts long) was preached in 2003, 2008, 2011, and 2015. Seriously, the series was last preached in January and February of this year. It was a seven-part series. That's not "seldom."

Further, tithing and giving are frequently stressed. I recall a sermon in which Morris was discussing his daughter coming to him and asking permission to date one of Gateway's members. (This man later became her husband, fwiw.) Before allowing her to date the man, Morris first had his assistant pull up the man's contribution records to ensure that he was a faithful giver.

So, yeah, if you haven't heard sermons about money and giving and tithes, I'm not sure what you're listening to.

Anonymous said...

Mzchit, you've said many useless things over the years and one day,you'll burn in the Hell fire of the Sun when the time comes.