4.05.2010

Anyone Missing A Camera?

Kinda funny. Faithful reader Tony sent in this pic over the weekend of a pooch who was gathering up Easter eggs -- which is pretty cute in its own right. But then he picked up another brightly colored object.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Awww....kids and dogs!

Anonymous said...

Dogs now, humans next. Under Obama's new healthcare plan, people will be required to bring their own digital cameras for use in colonoscopies. Press record, swallow, and hope for the best.

Anonymous said...

Just simply amazing how anybody could take a cute pic like this one and twist it into the health care theme.

And for your info 10:13 - cameras already exist that you ingest - after taking pics of your insides, you fish the thing out of the toilet, clean it up and take it into the doc.

Yuk.

Anonymous said...

Since I'm a scannerhead, just heard a suspicsious person call come in,.... someone wearing a ski mask and carrying a crowbar somewhere on 730 near Briar. Since I know this dog personally, I will put him on the call, all I can say is the dude better not have any Easter eggs or a camera in his possession!!!!

Anonymous said...

Barry, have you ever noticed that some dogs are smarter that their masters?

Anonymous said...

Dirty ol' egg suckin' dog!

Anonymous said...

Dogs don't see colors

Anonymous said...

The fact that dogs have two different types of cones does not mean that their brains have the ability to interpret the information that the rods and cones send. To determine what colors a dog can see, behavioral studies can be done. One such study conducted by Neitz, Geist and Jacobs involves three colored squares being placed in front of a dog. By training the dog to pick the odd colored square of the three, the researcher is able to guess what colors the dog can see. The question that then arose was if the dog was choosing the panel for it's color or due to it's brightness. It was found by use of different brightnesses for the squares that the dog was indeed choosing the square for the color and not brightness cues. Through these studies it has been suggested that an average dog sees similar to a human deuteranope, a person that is red-green colorblind. Consequently, the dog's world consists of yellows, blues, and grays. When a human perceives a red object it appears as yellow to the dog, while a green object appears as white, a shade of gray. This white region, also called the neutral point, occurs around 480 nm in visual spectrum. According to the electromagnetic spectrum, 480 nm would appear as a greenish-blue hue. All wavelengths longer than the neutral point are indistinguishable from one another to the dog and would all appear as yellow.

Anonymous said...

11:23, Oh yes they do, just in different hues.

mzchief said...

If you want to read the entire article, posted by anonymous 5:29, and get an idea of the colours seen by dogs here is the LINK to the article by Jennifer Davis.

Anonymous said...

THANKS MZ!!! Maybe we can clear up some old myths!!!!