1.04.2009

Incredible Random Thought

Hush a by Baby On the Tree Top, When the Wind blows The cradle will rock When the Bough breaks The Cradle will fall, Down tumbles baby, Cradle and all. What does that mean?

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

I heard the answer to that one time but I don't remember what it was. I'm sure a little research would lend us an answer.

Anonymous said...

It means "if this little bastard don't shut up I'm gonna climb a tree and toss him to the ground"

Anonymous said...

Well....

First off...

It would be best if you quoted the poem correctly....

Rock-a-bye by baby,
In the tree top

is what you were looking for.

Its soooooooo obvious you have no kids, that you know of.

Double Fake Mother Goose

Anonymous said...

From Wikipedia entry: "It is rumoured that it was written by a young pilgrim who sailed to America on the Mayflower. He was said to have observed the way native-American women rocked their babies in birch-bark cradles, which were suspended from the branches of trees, allowing the wind to rock the baby to sleep. However, the branches holding the cradles sometimes had a habit of breaking, causing the cradle to fall and the baby in it to get hurt." This was the first of a number of theories of origin that were listed.

I've always thought it was a slightly disturbing song to be singing to a baby...

On a side note, regarding the swearing-in picture from The Spin, who is the guy front row left, and why is he holding himself?

Anonymous said...

The author of this well-loved lullaby was reportedly a pilgrim who sailed on the Mayflower. The Wampanoag Indians, who befriended the colonists, carried their infants in cradleboards on their backs. In temperate weather, they suspended the cradles from tree limbs so that passing breezes could rock the babies while their mothers tended the maize and beans. With typical motherly indulgence, the cradles were decorated with shells, beads and porcupine quills. For sober-minded puritans, the sight of a birch tree festooned with such cradles must have been very memorable indeed.

Anonymous said...

When I was a child my mom sang "mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy".

For years I wondered what "marezee dotes and dozydotes and little lamzydivy" was.

Anonymous said...

Why does this blog have to show liberal weenies throwing away babies? Remember that to be pro choice, you first have to be born.

Anonymous said...

Maybe the same as:

Ring around the rosie,
Pocket full of posies,
Ashes, ashes,
we all fall down!

The small pox song!

In the day, when small pox was a killing virus, people would break out in red spots (rosie) with red rings around them. So many died from small pox that they had to bury them in mass graves.... posies (flowers) were put into the deceased pockets to help cover the stench until the pile of bodies could be burned, then buried together.

Nice little child's play song, huh?

Anonymous said...

I've always wondered what that baby was doing up on the tree top in a cradle in the first place.

Anonymous said...

Or...was it the Bubonic Plague that started that "ring around the rosie" song? One or the other.

Link to possible explanations of the Hush a by song:

http://www.answers.com/topic/rock-a-bye

Anonymous said...

Man, that is random!

Anonymous said...

Look at the explanation (did you not google for it?)!

JimHubbell said...

Mama wants you to go to sleep.

Ryan said...

I think it means that baby needs to suck it up and be a man.

Anonymous said...

It means CPS will be up your ass shortly asking why you had a baby in a cradle up a tree.

Anonymous said...

On December 21 2012 a lot of things will come tumbling down.

chupacabra said...

He forgot to tie off his safety belt when he started work for the crew trimming trees for the Wise County Co-op power line right of way?

"Hush a bye" is the correct, original phrase as Barry quoted.

This nursery rhyme was probably adapted to the American Indian legend from European womens habit of allowing their babies to swing suspended from tree limbs while they worked the hop fields in their home countries. The trees near and in a field would be cut around there circumference (girdled)to allow the sun to get to the crop and prevent the tree from using water needed by the crop. Since no John Deere tractors or Power Stroke 1 tons to pull the tree down it would stay in place in the fields with dry, dead limbs waiting to snap and put a hurtin' on ole junior.

Signed: Double Real Fake Former Literature Major

Anonymous said...

It means don't use your baby as a tree topper.

Anonymous said...

Lucky CPS wont get your ass for tossing the kid in the air.....they got no kids and never have any of them done anything wrong themselves @ CPS and this is an obvious case of Child abuse and endangerment! They will be looking for the baby thrower in the picture so best you just go ahead and turn your abusive ignorant ass in to the athority's in Decatur.... Oh my bad it is A CPS officer just showing a little love with his kiddo! Sorry I didnt recognise it for what it REALLY was ..can we back out all those frivolus charges and take your face off the front page of the local newspaper and re-right all the negative B.S. and damage done by being a little too over agressive and not realizeing it for what it actually was?

Yep think before yall jump as its that easy to wreck someones life and cause damage CPS dangerous group they are serious problems they cause and no remorse or accountablility!

Anonymous said...

what about the old woman who lived in a shoe with so many children she didnt know what to do? or rub-a-dub-dub three men in a tub? what are 3 men doing in a tub? if yall think about it, half of these nursery rhymes dont make a hell of alot of sense....thanks mother goose!!