blank'/> Liberally Lean From The Land Of Dairy Queen: But The Football Team Is Supposed to be Good!

8.01.2005

But The Football Team Is Supposed to be Good!

The TAKS results were released today. To find your school, check here: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/account/2005/districtlist.srch.html If I'm reading that correctly, Bridgeport High School was ranked as "Unacceptable". Well that's just...just....unacceptable

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

The reason for the unacceptable rating has to do with special education. As I understand it, the severely handicapped kids that are bussed from the nursing home on west side take the bulk of the exceptions granted for the taks. Therefore, Bridgeport has kids taking the taks that will never pass it and should never be required to take it. Unfair, but it is the law that these kids be mainstreamed. The operators of the nursing home essentially get free care for those kids about 8 hours/day even though they are paid for 24 hours. I have a very soft heart for those kids but having them in school is a definite waste of tax payer $$. Several require one on one assistance all day even though for the most part that means changing diapers and pushing their wheelchair to the cafeteria. Sad, don't ya think?

Anonymous said...

There must be a lot of kids being bussed in from the nursing home based on the number of kids who did not meet the standard.

Reading 119 or 29% did not meet standard
Social Studies 44 or 16% did not meet standard
Math 136 or 34% did not meet standard
Science 107 or 40% did not meet standard

Anonymous said...

If you read the results, the reason for an unacceptable rating are the numbers in orange. The format is kind of confusing. I don't remember the exact number of kid's being bussed but I think it is around 20. I did not do the math but if you consider those numbers, I suspect it would meet or exceed the state average.

Anonymous said...

The bottom line is there is a lot kids not passing the math and science portion of the test. Decatur wasn’t any better in those areas either.

Anonymous said...

I agree, there are too many. In my opinion, the state tests are a joke anyway. The state spends a ton of money to have these tests written (by an out of state company) and when too many kids do well they change the test to make it harder. We wouldn't want too many kids doing well, would we? My kid is bright, does well in AP classes, and did well on the taks. However, she said the test was much harder than before and told me before the results were released there were lots of kids that would not do well. The companies that write the tests have a powerful lobby in Austin. Their sole source of income in many cases are these tests. It is planned obsolescence. Without new tests, the cash cow dies. Like with many things, follow the money.

Anonymous said...

My complaint is not with the test but with the school district. Our kid’s talk about how they spend time taking practice test and their teacher going over what they think is on the test. We are sent letters instructing us as parents to make sure we feed our kids breakfast on the day of the test and to make sure they get plenty of rest the night before. All this in hopes the students do well on the test and the school district will not be embarrassed. Then after the test is over they coast to the end of the school year. Maybe if we turn off the cell phones (both teachers and students) and focus on quality learning every school day, we wouldn't do so poorly.
I wonder what Southlake Carroll did to achieve the results they did or maybe it is just the make-up of their students (90% white non poor)

Anonymous said...

I can not believe that every district in the state does not have severely handicapped kids. If schools spent more time on reading, writing, and math and less time on sports we might do better on the test. I can count on one hand the number of kids that have graduated from BHS and have made their living playing football or basketball. Hit the books!

Anonymous said...

It is not that every school doesn't have handicapped kids, it is the percentage of handicapped kids that matter. When the facility in Azle closed and they brought the kids to the west side nursing home, it skewed the percentages. The part about coasting to the end of the school year is absolutely true. We could solve our school finance problem by starting school after labor day and ending it a month early. The coasting after tests is not unique to Bridgeport. It happens in most school districts. Not all teachers do it, but I would say the majority do. What would school finances be if they saved a month and a half utilities, bus routes, etc? It might not solve all the problems but it would go a long way. It is not the number of days in school that matters, it is how that time is used.

Jeff said...

Reading the responses from two people calling themselves anonymous is almost as confusing as the TAKS reporting itself.