The Campaign For DA

5.24.2017

We Need Bridgeport Clarification


I mentioned in Random Thoughts that Bridgeport celebrated its 150 anniversary in the 1970s.

A couple of people corrected me, said it was 100, and one even sent the above image. That's pretty strong evidence.

But another guy said no -- that it was the 150th of at least something because he remembers the name sesquicentennial.  I distinctly remember that name as being part of the celebration, too. And it couldn't be for Texas since that didn't occur until 1986.

What gives?

Edit: This may be the best explanation . . .

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

The state of Texas celebrated a sesquicentennial in 1986.

Anonymous said...

Bridgeport began in 1860, due to the first bridge being built. Maybe something official happened in 1873, like a post office or something, but it had its beginnings as a settlement in 1860. So it will be no more than 157 years old as of 2017.

Triple Fake... said...

"Bridgeport's history began in February 1860 when William H. Hunt was granted a charter from the West Fork Bridge Company to build a bridge across the West Fork of the Trinity River.
In 1873 a new iron bridge was built and a post office established, thus formally creating the city of Bridgeport, TX."

Somebody has a faulty memory. It was definitely the centennial

Anonymous said...

All I remember, is no one knew what a sesquicentennial was and everyone had to look it up to find out it meant 150 years.

And the gentlemen in the photo from the Index are wearing the goofy ties referenced earlier. Nothing like wearing a tie and a vest in July while loading groceries into a hot car.

I think this confirms Barry did the math.

Double Fake Sasquatch, former Foodway "sack boy"

Anonymous said...

According to the Wikipedia entry for Wise County, TX, "The first white settler arrived [in Wise County] in 1854 and the first public school opened in 1855."

So unless we're talking about the Native American village of Bridgeport, I don't think you were celebrating 150 years.

(And we all know that Wikipedia is never wrong... wink, wink.)

Anonymous said...

Charming news reports. I love that contestants were require to rock nonstop except when they were allowed to stop.

Anonymous said...

The centennial production had a cast of 350? People?

Anonymous said...

Nothing gives. Why are false statements so often considered as "possible facts" and given the same consideration as facts? To the point that someone has to ask "what gives?"

Anonymous said...

What ignorance for people to comment that only "Native Americans" were around pre mid-1850s in what would become Wise County. Completely clueless.

Anonymous said...

Quick follow up....


We had a discussion at dinner last night with several long time Bport residence. The overwhelming position taken was that it was the Centennial, not Sesquicentennial in 1973.

However, references to Sesquicentennial were also remembered. Several of us remembered looking it up in the dictionary to see what it meant.(no google in those days) The group conclusion was that Sesquicentennial was used in reference to opening the time capsule that was buried in 1973. We were thinking the plan would be do dig it up in 2023 and that is why Sesquicentennial was mentioned.